Picture This

60 SEK

Picture This is a little collection of ekphrastic poems based on (mostly) famous paintings. An ekphrastic poem is about a work of art. Most often it is about a painting, photograph or sculpture. All, but one of these poems have been previously published.

 

Anne-Marie Ericson, former lecturer of Pedagogics at Linköping University, described this book in one word, ”Outstanding.”

Yes, it’s a little outstanding book. Diamonds are also little. These poems will sparkle in your mind and send bursts of light to the neurons that cause smiles. I’m reminded of what a woman said about Janice’s other book of poetry, Om du var hos mig nu (If You Were With Me Now):

“I didn’t think I liked poetry until I read this book.

 

It is said that a picture can speak a thousand words. Janice uses few words to speak of pictures and enrich us with exciting perspectives.

 

Cecilia Gallerani Sits for Leonardo in 1483

(To the picture Lady with an Ermine, by Leoardo da Vinci)


Weird is what I’d call him, a cold fish.
Handsome, in truth, but not a man I’d take
to bed. Hanging around the gallows tree,
his silent charcoal pressed to silent paper,
hanging around the morgue, his sharp knives
slicing through the chilly air, sickly-sweet
the smells he pries into, a strange diversion
for a man of thirty. They say he plays the
lyre impeccably, yet has no mood for love.
There was that scandal with the model lad,
of course; hushed up but all Milan has heard.
Sit still, the insolent fellow snarls; I haven’t
moved a thumb. His yellow eyes seem
cruel as my sweet ermine’s own. Brilliant,
but a braggart, says Il Moro, a head chock-full
of dubious designs, small wonder the Medici
let him go. His letter to milord the Duke
related schemes to change the course of war:
new cannons, ships and armored cars, and even,
so he hints now, a machine that lifts and flies.
Indeed! How my neck aches, but be still the
fellow growls as if he sees my thoughts. I will
ignore this fool and dwell on sweeter things;
what largess will the Duke grant me when I turn
seventeen?

_____________

 

155mm * 220mm, 28 pages, illustrated chapbook